How we’re iterating towards our API competition

Today, we launched a competition for people to build services using our APIs. You can enter our API competition here. The competition is a chance for us to:

  1. Find out if our APIs are sufficiently well-engineered and clearly documented that third parties can access the API without needing help
  2. Identify new APIs that would help us develop our services further
  3. Generate new ideas for online services
  4. Identify new partners we can work with

But some of the details are still to be sorted out. Here’s why.

It seemed like a good idea to find out whether our APIs were so good that people could use them first time, unaided (as per the Service Standard). That meant working with people who haven’t been involved in their creation.

But we didn’t know:

  • Whether anyone would want to enter,
  • What prize / incentives we should offer
  • Whether people would want to develop a simple prototype or build a whole service
  • We wanted to protect the privacy of the data behind the APIs but ensure that it was a genuine test of the APIs that had been built

We began by posting the idea to Twitter in a Google Doc for people to share and discuss. The Twitter activity reached over 15,000 people, which was a good indication that there would be some interest in the competition. Lots of people that we don’t know talked about it – although we probably haven’t yet reached enough local people. People suggested a range of prizes, which meant that we didn’t have to dictate how developed the prototype needed to be.

Then on Friday, I spoke at a UK Authority roundtable following their report: ‘APIs for the Public Good’, sponsored by Cognizant. It was a great opportunity to talk about the competition and to get advice from the other panellists on its design.

Today we’ve launched the competition in two phases, beginning with a call for ideas. Depending on the entries, we’ll then explore the opportunities and timeframes. This may be dependent on our ability to ensure the APIs meet the needs of the best ideas, the way in which we’ll provide secure access to the APIs and the feasibility of the services. But we’ll determine these once we’ve seen the range of ideas.

It’s not a traditional way of running a competition. But by opening up our thinking, the idea is already getting better.

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