Holding a great show and tell

We’ve been running show and tells for nearly a year, and in that time we’ve run 57 by my count, across 7 different services. That’s enough to have a model about what makes a great show and tell. Here’s what we’ve learnt:

1. Names don’t matter
Some people read ‘show and tell’ in their diary and don’t know what it is and assume it can’t be important. We put people first, so if ‘show and tell’ doesn’t work, we can call it ‘project update’ or ‘workshop’, ‘knowledge share’ or even ‘project board’.

2. Timing does
The optimal show and tell lasts half an hour. If attendees want it to last longer, it can continue. But we should prepare about 15 minutes content.

3. Venue
Make it easy for people to get there. Ideally, allow people to find out about it as it starts. Make it inclusive. Show and tells in meeting rooms don’t get noticed.

4. How to begin
The beginning of the event needs four things:
A welcome – it’s just polite
Thank you for coming – a show and tell is only valuable if people turn-up
The vision for the project – show and tells grow so often people are hearing it for the first time. Remind people what we’re trying to achieve.
The purpose of the event – a good show and tell will repeat back to people what they already know. You need to explain that’s for them to check we’ve listened and learnt, and identify any outliers or gaps.

5. The structure
There are two main parts to a show and tell: what we’ve done, what we will do. For some groups, we will need to create a third for their questions – but ideally the feedback has already started.

6. The presentation
Everyone has a role. A good show and tell is a team presenting its work. Everyone should have a role in explaining part of the story.

Show the product, don’t talk about the process.

Less jargon. Do people really need to hear ‘sprint’ rather than ‘fortnight’?

Remember to talk about us, our, we and team. Colleagues aren’t ‘them’, ‘the users’ or ‘officers’.

7. The message
Most listeners will remember 2-3 key points, and little more. Know what you want to say before you write a word on a slide. Have prompts ready to stimulate discussion, should you not get much feedback.

8. The deck
A slide deck is useful for people who couldn’t attend, and starts to collect valuable assets for your Service Standard assessments (screen grabs, personas).

Most rooms have a screen big enough for 10 words or part of a screen. Prepare lots of slides rather than one slide with lots of content.

9. Preparation
A show and tell is an important presentation, often to senior leaders. Practice – at least once, preferably as a team. Get a second pair of eyes on your presentation. Know how the projector works.

Prepare your attendees. Email them to remind them that you’re looking forward to seeing them. Explain that you’ll start on time because there’s a lot to cover. Remind them their input is important. Tell them biscuits (fruit?) will be provided

10. Plan B
Presentations go wrong. Plan B might be huddling around an iPad. Maybe the attendees get out their phones and open a URL. Don’t spend their time waiting for you to make the computer work.

11. Feedback
Capture feedback – ideally visibly. Write it on a post-it and put it on the wall. Don’t just nod. Get people to write their own thoughts – for example, annotate drawings. Feedback matters – so show it.

12. Thank you
Thank people for coming. Remind them that their input will make a better product. Remind them you’ll be back in a fortnight.

13. Learn
Retrospectives are for another blogpost, but should always happen after a show and tell. Reflect on what you’ve done and what you’ve learnt. Re-plan what needs to happen next. If the next fortnight looks as you anticipated the previous fortnight, you haven’t learnt enough.

By the end the year we’ll have passed 100 show and tells, and will have a more developed model. But in the meantime, if you follow this, you’ll learn more.

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